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Saturday

Hot
Hot
High: 98 °F
Low: 67 °F

Sunday

Hot
Hot
High: 97 °F
Low: 64 °F

Monday

Mostly Sunny
Mostly Sunny
High: 93 °F
Low: 63 °F

Outdoor Report

    Santa Clarita Valley Outdoor Report: Contrails

    Six seconds into this YouTube clip of John Ford’s classic western, “Cheyenne Autumn”, you can hear the narrator identify the date as September 7, 1878.  Meanwhile, as the opening scene fades from darkness into view, you can see a vertical contrail hanging in the sky.  This creates a slight problem - because contrails are made by airplanes and airplanes didn’t start flying until 1903.  Whoops!

    Santa Clarita Outdoor Report: Melting Snow

    I’m not sure I can ask this question without smirking just a bit:  Cold enough for you?  That’s because I went to college in Minnesota; in St. Paul, the average temperature in December ranges from 27 (high) to 12 (low).  But last week, I discovered something that dimmed that smirk just a bit.  Something I thought I knew about snow was WRONG!

    SCV Outdoor Report Best Of: Juniper Berries

    Earlier this year, my husband and I took a drive out to the eastern edge of the Santa Clarita valley.  It was a sunny morning, so we bundled up in our jackets and took the top down. 

    As we drove along Agua Dulce Canyon road, the junipers caught my eye - they were chock full of plump, greyish-blue berries.  But, according to botanists, they’re not really berries.

    Santa Clarita Outdoor Report: “Raspberry Red, Lemon Yellow and Orange Orange”

    As we move into the beginnings of the rainy season, our sunsets are becoming more colorful.  They remind me of the early Twix cereal commercials, the ones with the “silly rabbit” singing “Raspberry red, lemon yellow and orange orange”?  As a child, I was drawn to those colorful Trix packages in the cereal aisle.  But as an adult, I’m much more impressed by the fiery reds I see at twilight.  And I love how those nuggets of lemon yellow and orange orange have magically transformed into blazing yellow and flaming orange.

    Santa Clarita Outdoor Report, Best Of: Collecting Dust

    Thanksgiving is in two weeks...but for many people... the preparation has already begun. Inviting family & friends, menu planning, grocery shopping, cooking and CLEANING.  At our house, it’s time to do a bit of dusting.  It’s amazing how quickly dust can collect on the furniture.

    SCV Outdoor Report Best Of: Twitter Principles

    It was the pun that first caught my attention - “Twitter Principles of Social Networking Increase Family Success in Nesting Birds”.  OK, so it wasn’t a great pun.  But it does illustrate that since the first “tweet” was sent on March 21, 2006, tweeting (among humans, not just birds) has become so popular that now even scientists are making puns about it.  I decided to read further.

    Santa Clarita Valley Outdoor Report: Contrarian Wildflower

    “Hoary Fuchsia” is a contrarian wildflower.  For starters, it’s a contradiction in terms - a combination of words whose meanings are in conflict with one another.  The word hoary means “having grey or white hair”, while fuchsia means “a bright reddish-purple color”.   What were those botanists thinking when they named that flower?

    Best Of SCV Outdoor Report: Sniff Sniff

    For those of you who remember the pre-cellphone era: have you ever scanned a crowd to find someone?  Perhaps a friend you were supposed to meet.  Perhaps a child who wandered away from your group? 

    Can you remember how your eyes transitioned from a “wide area scan” to a narrow focus when you thought you’d found them?  Well, it turns out that animals have this skill too.  Not only can they focus their sight, they can also focus their nose.

    Santa Clarita Valley Outdoor Report: Moving Too Fast...

    We don’t always see what’s going on around us, especially if it’s moving too fast.  For example, if you’re reading this on a computer screen, what you are seeing is being redrawn at a rate of 60-75 times per second (60-75 Hz).  Yet we perceive a constant image; why don’t we see the screen flickering?