Alerts Button
E-Alerts
Podcasts Button
Podcasts
Movies
Movies
Youtube Button
Youtube
Traffic Button
Traffic
ListenLive Button
ListenLive

Tuesday

Increasing Clouds
Increasing Clouds
High: 90 °F
Low: 61 °F

Wednesday

Mostly Sunny
Mostly Sunny
High: 86 °F
Low: 60 °F

Thursday

Sunny
Sunny
High: 85 °F
Low: 60 °F

KHTS' Local Artist Spotlight: Jimmy Marino (Auguster)

Jimmy Marino is a 19-year-old singer/songwriter from Canyon Country who crafts emotionally-charged, delicate melodies with hints of folk, pop and rock. He is functioning under the moniker Auguster in his upcoming album. 


Don't miss a thing. Get breaking Santa Clarita news alerts delivered right to your inbox.


 His lyrics are accessible to audiences, and his vocals are infused with raw emotion. His music is an effective sum of gentle instrumentals filled to the brim with feeling, accompanied by sentimental lyrics that pull at one’s heartstrings

“For me, my biggest goal is to deliver a raw, emotional product, and a lot of artists are afraid to do that. So for me to strip back all of the fears, inhibitions and to just say that these are my rawest emotions in their most vulnerable form is actually very scary and risky,” Marino said.

“However, ultimately, my desire to share what I do outweighs my nerves.”

His past work includes standouts such as “Little Bird.”  With the build up of the piano, the increasing volatility of Marino’s vocals instilling emotional gravity to the song, contrasted with the delicate content of the track, it is evident Marino’s gentle-yet-impassioned aesthetic is refined and well-executed in "Little Bird." 

“Little Bird” is audacious and perfect, a sheer indicator of Marino’s uncontrived ability to compel his audience; and, according to Marino, a mere consequence of luck.

“‘Little Bird’ was my lucky song (laughs). Every songwriter has one and I used up my luck with that one,” he said. “It was inspired by a falling out with a close friend of mine. I played the main piano part on accident, and I was initially writing the song in a different direction. I was really at the right place at the right time when I was writing that song.”

The song blossoms with Marino’s recurring piano melody and Marino’s beautifully jarring voice, and builds up as the emotional content of the song escalates, adding a truly intoxicating effect.  The production style of “Little Bird” is audacious in itself, with the incorporation and layering of stringed instruments and multi-vocals.

Marino cites Glen Hansard, vocalist for folk rock duo the Swell Season, as an influence for conjuring the vocal build-up in “Little Bird.”

“You can feel Glen Hansard when you listen to him,” Marino said. “You hear him pour his heart out. It’s beautiful and brilliant. That’s what I essentially strive to do.”

His new album A Change of Scene’s release date is currently being solidified. It is a huge departure from his last album and features new content in uncharted territory.

“Originally I was just able to write your standard love song. My last album was not as well-rounded,” Marino said. “With this new album, the emotional pay-off was a lot bigger for me. I’ve been able to expand my horizons and write about themes of homesickness and relationships beyond romantic ones. I’m just proud for evolving past the standard of ‘I miss you. I love you. Come back,’” Marino said with a laugh.

“Tunnels,” another main single off the new album, is a raw, stirring track that is full of vulnerability with a simple arrangement of vocals and guitars. Though the song has potential for a grander arrangement, its simplicity adds a powerful effect to the song.

“I could have done more with the song; however, I just left it to solely piano, crowd vocals and vocals,” Marino said.

The fluctuations of Marino’s cadence when he sings the chorus of “Tunnels” is the highlight of the single.  

“During my very first performance with ‘Tunnels,’ it was during a storm and there were power outages rolling through,” he said. “The chorus goes ‘Tell me / Tell me / If you can see / If there’s a light at the end.’ And when I screamed the word ‘light,’ the lights went out. It was the very first performance of the song. There were people crying at the end, and it was just a very emotional moment for all of us.”  

Due to the nature and wistful content of Marino’s music, he said that many people are brought to tears during his performances.

“Half of me says thank you so much. It’s the biggest compliment as a songwriter to know your music is emotional enough to make people cry, but the other half of me just feels bad that I’m making people cry,” he said with a laugh. “However, my biggest payoff in writing music is having an emotional effect on someone and giving something for people to hold onto.”

For more information on Jimmy Marino’s music, visit his facebook page or his soundcloud.




KHTS' Local Artist Spotlight: Jimmy Marino (Auguster)


Article: KHTS' Local Artist Spotlight: Jimmy Marino (Auguster)
Source: Santa Clarita News
Author: Luzzei Tsuji