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Sacramento Road Trip - Lobbying Items - I-5 Truck Lanes

FACT SHEET:
The Interstate 5 Corridor
in Northern Los Angeles County

The I-5 corridor is the lifeline for commerce and sustained economic growth and development in our region and our state.

Every California business, every resident, every consumer, every traveler depends on the safety and efficiency of this road.

The I-5 in northern Los Angeles County carries more than 200,000 vehicles every day, including more than 19,000 trucks. That is an astounding 73 million-plus vehicles a year, including at least 7 million trucks.

The I-5 is near capacity today. In the meantime, Los Angeles County’s population is projected to grow by 3 million people in the next 20 years.

The fastest growing sub-region in Los Angeles County is Northern Los Angeles County, including the cities of Santa Clarita, Palmdale and Lancaster.

Traffic is projected to increase by 65 percent over the next 10 years, and by 114 percent over the next 20 years.

Airport passenger and cargo traffic in the Los Angeles County/southern Kern County region is expected to double in the next 20 years; seaport traffic is expected to triple.

A proposal to help address congestion in the I-5 corridor was put forth by the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority.

Specific project alternatives, environmental and other studies to move the project forward have been proposed by Caltrans. A public/private partnership between Caltrans and the Golden State Gateway Coalition has been formed to complete the studies by the summer of 2008.

The proposal would add northbound and southbound truck lanes and carpool (high occupancy vehicle) lanes to the I-5 corridor in northern Los Angeles County. This would greatly improve passenger and commercial vehicle mobility and safety in this busy and important corridor.

Initial federal funding of $1.6 million was authorized for the project in the national surface transportation authorization bill (SAFETEA-LU), passed in July 2005.

The total project cost is to be determined, with estimates in the $500 million range.

The project is needed, is realistic and enjoys broad community support.

These improvements to I-5, California’s main north-south thoroughfare, would yield benefits far exceeding its costs: mitigating traffic congestion, improving roadway safety, adding jobs, fostering economic development, alleviating air pollution, expediting goods movement and accommodating defense and homeland security transportation needs.