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Vin Scully’s Return

Vin Scully, Hall of Fame announcer and long-time voice of the Dodgers, has decided to return to the broadcast booth for the 2011 season, his 62nd as the Dodgers broadcaster.

His 61 years of service makes him the longest tenured sports broadcaster in baseball history. Scully claims good health and a strong love for the game are what helped him make his decision.

“I’m just honored and humbled to continue my association with the Dodgers, which has been a major part of my life," Scully said in a release.

Scully joined the Dodgers is 1950 while they were in Brooklyn. He shared the booth with Hall of Famer Red Barber and Connie Desmond during his first three years. Some of the more memorable Dodger games Scully called include Game 1 of the 1988 World Series in which Kirk Gibson hit his famous two-run, ninth inning home run off of Oakland Athletics reliever Dennis Eckersley and Don Larsen’s perfect game for the New York Yankees against the Dodgers in the 1956 World Series. Scully would later say that Larsen’s perfect game was the greatest individual performance he has ever seen.


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Scully was also in the broadcast booth for two of the most impressive streaks in baseball history. He called every game of Don Drysdale’s consecutive scoreless inning streak in 1968. Twenty years later, he was in the broadcast booth when Orel Hershiser broke Drysdale’s record in 1988.

Scully called his share of milestone home runs, too. He called Hank Aaron’s 715th career home against Al Downing of the Dodgers and the 71st, 72nd and 73rd home runs of Barry Bonds during his record-breaking 2001 season.

“I’m as thrilled as our fans that Vin will be returning,” Dodger owner Frank McCourt said in a release. “He is not only the greatest broadcaster of all time, but also a wonderful friend.”

In his long, successful broadcasting career, Scully has called three perfect games, 19 no-hitters, 25 World Series and 12 All-Star games. He was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1982.

Scully is and always will be considered one of the greatest sports broadcasters of all time. The Dodgers franchise, fans and baseball enthusiasts are fortunate to have Scully in the booth. When he eventually retires, sports will have lost a legend and an irreplaceable talent.

Cincinnati Reds announcer Marty Brennaman told National Public Radio that, “We’re all known as play-by-play guys. Vinny’s not a play-by-play guy. Vinny’s a storyteller.”