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Sunday

Hot
Hot
High: 100 °F
Low: 72 °F

Monday

Hot
Hot
High: 97 °F
Low: 70 °F

Tuesday

Partly Sunny
Partly Sunny
High: 94 °F
Low: 65 °F

Voter Registration For May 19 Election Today

 

Monday is the last day that county residents can register to vote in the upcoming May 19 Statewide Special and Consolidated Elections.

Individuals who wish to register must be at least 18 years of age by election day, a U.S. Citizen and resident of Los Angeles County, and not in prison or on parole for conviction of a felony. If the voter has recently moved, made a legal name change, or wishes to change political party affiliation, the voter must re-register to vote.

 

Voter registration forms are readily available at over 1,240 locations across the county – including Department of Motor Vehicles offices, libraries, fire stations, post offices, public assistance offices (DPSS, WIC), and City Clerk offices.

 

An online voter registration form is also available at the RR/CC website www.lavote.net by clicking on the Secretary of State link found under Resources on the main page or by calling the Voter Registration Request Line - (800) 481-VOTE (8683).

 

Voters may check the status of their registration online at www.lavote.net by clicking the Voter Registration Status button on the main page or by calling the RR/CC at (562) 466-1310 or (562) 466-1323.

 

The election, proposed by the Governor and state legislature, puts several propositions before the voters to address the current budget crisis. If the measures do not pass, it is not certain where the legislature will turn for monies they are hoping for should the measures be approved.

 

There are six propositions before the electorate:

  • 1A – “Rainy Day” Budget Stabilization Fund – Changes the budget process; takes above-average revenues to be collected to be used during economic downturns and other purposes. Extends state tax of 1 cent imposed on April 1, 2009 to expire in 2013 instead of 2011.
  • 1B – Education Funding – Requires supplemental payments to local school districts and community colleges to address recent budget cuts; ballot states that savings could be billions of dollars in 2009-2010 and 2010-2011, but costs could be in the billions thereafter.
  • 1C – Lottery Modernization Act – Proposes “modernizations” that include increased payouts, improved marketing and effective management. State maintains ownership and protects funding levels for schools currently provided. Increased lottery revenues would be used to address current budget deficit and reduce the need for additional tax increases and cuts to state programs. Allows $5 billion of borrowing from future lottery profits to help balance 2009-2010 budget. Resulting debt –service payments would make it difficult to balance future budgets.
  • 1D – Children’s Services Funding – Reduces funding for early childhood development programs provided by the First Five – California Children and Families Program to put money toward balancing the budget. General fund savings of $608 million in 2009-2010 and $268 million in 2010-2011.
  • 1E – Mental Health Funding: Temporary Reallocation – Amends Mental health Services Act (Prop. 63 of 2004) to transfer funds, for two years, to pay for mental health services provided through Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment Program for children and young adults. General fund savings of $230 million annually for two years, corresponding reduction in funding available for mental health services.
  • 1F – Elected Official Salaries: Prevent Pay Increases During Budget Deficit Years – Governor and other elected officials are prevented from receiving pay raises in years when state is running at a deficit, determined by Director of Finance.

 

A recent Field Poll revealed that only 14 percent of the registered voters approve of the job that the legislature is doing, while 74 percent (three out of four) disapprove.

 

Of the voters preferences noted in the survey, 33 percent do not support any of the proposals, 54 percent support some but not all and only 13 percent support all the propositions.

 

For more information, including a breakdown of the propositions by the state’s Legislative Analysis, click here .