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Hospital Celebrates Connector Completion

Henry Mayo Corridor Now Complete

Image Henry Mayo Newhall Memorial Hospital celebrated the completion of a corridor that now connects the hospital’s main building with its Pavilion on Thursday. This is a move that will significantly improve the comfort and safety of patient transportation, as well as the delivery of care between the buildings.

 
As part of this building dedication event, photographs with a “Connections” theme that were submitted by local photographers have been professionally framed and now hang on permanent display inside the connecting corridor.

 

Construction of the connecting corridor began on April 24, 2006. The structure stands 32 feet in height, and measures 265 feet in length.

Image“The connecting corridor will greatly enhance the safety of our patients, allowing for a more comfortable and safer patient transport between the Pavilion and main hospital building,” said Roger Seaver, president/CEO.

“It will also enable the approximately 80-90 patients housed in the Pavilion to now have easier access to the main hospital and all of its services,” Seaver continued. “Those patients are no longer going to be isolated physically. Instead, they will be given easier access to our full compliment of care and services provided by Henry Mayo as a whole.”

Patient transportation between the Pavilion and main hospital structure is critical because of the patient care services that are provided in those two buildings. The Pavilion includes acute care, acute rehabilitation and transitional care unit services. The main hospital building includes surgical, critical care and acute care services.

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The connecting corridor was also built because of a mandate required by the state’s Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD), according to Bob Knoblauch, director of Facilities.

“Because we have acute care units operating in both buildings, the state requires that there be an enclosed connection where patients can be transported from one building to the other,” he explained.

Physicians will also benefit from the completed connecting corridor, Knoblauch said.  “Thanks to better access from the adjacent parking lot, physicians will now be able to save precious time on their patient visits, as they will have improved direct access to either hospital building,” he explained.